May 27, 2024

Kylie Randberg (right) has gained knowledge and skills as a Clemson AVS student and U.S. Army ROTC member at that will directly apply to her duties in the Army post-graduation.Kylie Randberg (right) has gained knowledge and skills as a Clemson AVS student and U.S. Army ROTC member at that will directly apply to her duties in the Army post-graduation.


Kylie Randberg (right) has gained knowledge and skills as a Clemson AVS student and U.S. Army ROTC member that will directly apply to her duties in the Army post-graduation.

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Kylie Randberg combines her degree in Animal and Veterinary Sciences with knowledge gained from a stint in the United States Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program at Clemson University to fulfill her passion to “make a difference in animals’ lives.”

Randberg is from Bohemia, New York – a small town on Long Island. Following her passion for animals, she enrolled in the Clemson AVS program four years ago.

“I’ve always been fascinated by biology and the intricacies of animal health,” Randberg said. “I wanted to pursue a career where I could directly contribute to animal welfare and veterinary medicine.”

Kylie Randberg's understanding of animal biology and health management will help her provide effective veterinary care for military working dogs, while her training in animal behavior will aid in handling the dogs in various environmentsKylie Randberg's understanding of animal biology and health management will help her provide effective veterinary care for military working dogs, while her training in animal behavior will aid in handling the dogs in various environments
Kylie Randberg’s understanding of animal biology and health management will help her provide effective veterinary care for military working dogs.

In addition to her studies, Randberg is also a cadet in Clemson’s Army ROTC program. She joined after her older sister participated in the program at the University of Georgia.

“She shared with me all the benefits of being a part of the ROTC,” Randberg said. “Her experience and insights were influential in my decision, as she spoke highly of the leadership training, financial support for college and the sense of purpose that comes with serving in the military. Seeing her thrive and succeed through ROTC motivated me to follow in her footsteps and pursue this path myself.”

Randberg will serve as an officer in the Medical Service Corps after she is commissioned during graduation. She plans to care for military working dogs.

“I chose to serve in the Medical Service Corps with the aim of attending veterinary or PA school,” she said. “This specialization aligns with my interests in health care and animal care, allowing me to serve both my country and pursue my professional goals simultaneously.”

PA is short for physician assistant. The Army offers the Interservice Physician Assistant Program or IPAP, and pays for officers to participate in this program.

Her time as a Clemson AVS student and ROTC member, as well as serving in the South Carolina National Guard, has taught Randberg knowledge and skills that will directly apply to her duties in the Army post-graduation.

Kylie Randberg and her rescue pet Boone.Kylie Randberg and her rescue pet Boone.
Kylie Randberg and her rescue pet Boone.

“Understanding animal biology and health management will help me provide effective veterinary care for military working dogs, while my training in animal behavior will aid in handling the dogs in various environments,” she said. “Additionally, my background in biology will assist in identifying and addressing potential health risks, including zoonotic diseases.”

Zoonotic diseases are caused by germs that spread between animals and people. Information from the Centers for Disease Control shows zoonotic diseases are common and are caused by germs such as viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi.

After graduating from Clemson and being commissioned as a second lieutenant, Randberg will serve as a cadre or officer in charge, of a platoon of cadets during summer training at Fort Knox in Kentucky. She will then serve in the Basic Officer Leader Course at the U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence at Fort Sam Houston in Texas.

“These experiences will prepare me for my duty station for the next four years, where I’ll continue to apply my skills and training to serve both in the medical field and as a military officer,” Randberg said.

The Deep Orange 14 experience

In addition to serving in ROTC and studying in the AVS program, Randberg also worked with students and faculty at the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR) in Greenville, South Carolina, on the Deep Orange 14 project. Deep Orange 14 is an off-road reconnaissance and relief autonomous vehicle used during emergencies to deliver supplies and collect real-time data to help responders.

Working at CU-ICAR helped her learn critical problem-solving and teamwork skills.

“This experience solidified my ability to work effectively with diverse teams toward a common goal,” she said. “I know these skills will be invaluable in my military career and any future endeavors in veterinary medicine or related fields.”

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