July 13, 2024

Can incorporating yogurt into your diet keep diabetes at bay?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has implied that it’s possible.

The health agency announced in March that it will not object to a claim from Danone North America — maker of Dannon and other popular yogurt brands — that regularly eating yogurt could reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

The FDA intends to allow the claim to appear on yogurt food labels, “provided that the qualified health claims are worded so as not to mislead consumers, and that other factors for the use of the claim are met.”

“After reviewing the petition and other evidence related to the proposed qualified health claim, the FDA determined that there is some credible evidence supporting a relationship between yogurt intake and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, but this evidence is limited,” the FDA said in a statement.

The health claim that the FDA recently approved is referred to as a “qualified claim.” 

That means the evidence isn’t strong or conclusive, but is suggestive of benefit to human health, noted Sherry Coleman Collins, a food allergy dietician and expert from the Atlanta metropolitan area.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has implied that it’s possible for yogurt to keep diabetes at bay.
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Regular consumption is considered 2 cups (3 servings) per week of yogurt, which is the minimum amount for this qualified health claim.

“I don’t like the idea of suggesting that one food alone has the power to reduce disease, because we know it’s really all about the pattern of eating,” she told Fox News Digital.

“Yogurt — as part of a diet rich in plant-based foods like fruits, vegetables and whole grains, protein foods like lean meats and/or beans, lentils and soy, and fermented dairy — has shown to be very health-promoting,” Collins added.

The FDA intends to allow the claim to appear on yogurt food labels, “provided that the qualified health claims are worded so as not to mislead consumers, and that other factors for the use of the claim are met.” Getty Images

Yogurt that contains live, active cultures is a great way to get good bacteria in the diet, according to Collins. 

“A healthy gut, which is one with diverse microbiota and heavy in healthy strains, reduces the risk of many chronic conditions,” she said. 

“The good bacteria found in fermented dairy are associated with overall better health and lower rates of disease, including type 2 diabetes.”

Regular consumption is considered 2 cups (3 servings) per week of yogurt, which is the minimum amount for this qualified health claim. Getty Images

When choosing yogurt, Collins recommended looking for varieties that are low in added sugar.

“Plain Greek yogurt is fantastic, because it’s high in protein and calcium, and you can adjust the sweetness to your liking by adding a little honey and/or fruit,” she said.

There’s likely no additional benefit beyond a couple of servings, Collins said.

Fox News Digital reached out to Danone requesting comment.

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